Black History Month 2024

'disease' - 4 results

Inoculation Brought to America



Boston, American Colonies - Onesimus brought smallpox inoculation to Boston. It saved dozens of lives. It was the first time inoculation was known to whites, in America.

Cotton Mather was a white slaveowner. He enslaved Onesimus. Mather feared smallpox and wanted some way to treat it. Onesimus offered inoculation as a cure. Mather tried it first on enslaved Black Americans. When they did not get sick, Mather used it on his white family.

Thousands got sick from smallpox, in Boston. Hundreds died. Those who were inoculated only died at a 2% rate. That compared to a 10% rate for all others. People in Boston died 5 times as much as those inoculated.

For all the lives saved, neither Mather nor the whites in Boston gave Onesimus his freedom. Instead, Onesimus had to work many more years to buy his freedom from slavery.

Source:
Onesimus Inoculated Boston


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Atlanta Vaccination War



Atlanta, Georgia - White doctors and white police forced Black Americans to take injections. The claim by whites was that it was to stop smallpox. An inoculation for smallpox was known more than 150 years before, by the Black American man Onesimus.

Under the pretense of vaccination, white police broke into a Black American home. Inside, there was a wedding, with guests. The white police held everyone inside the home. White doctors came and forcibly injected them.

A judge was over a city court, where many Black Americans were normally brought. When the judge gave the word, whites locked all inside. Black Americans were forced to take injections. The white police used violence to force injections.


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Tuskegee Experiment Exposed



Washington, D. C. - A 40 year-long syphilis experiment on Black American men was exposed. The Washington Star reported the story. The United States government used Black American men as test subjects, without their consent.

600 Black American men were used. They were rural farmers. They were never told they had the disease. A cure was known, but the Federal government never treated the men.

The experiment ended only because it was exposed. No one was punished.


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AIDS disease Blamed on Black Women



Washington, D. C. - The Center for disease Control (CDC) made its first attempt to blame AIDS on Black American women. After this report, race was counted as a factor in AIDS.

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) was the AIDS report from the CDC. It made a link betwen Black American and hispanic women and AIDS. Never again, was AIDS questioned as a disease. It made Black American women the face of it.

Source:

AIDS & Black American women

AIDS Blamed on Black Americans


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