Black History Month 2022

family

The Mann Act Went Into Effect



Washington, D. C. - The Mann Act, or White-Slave Traffic Act, became law. It was passed to stop black boxing champion Jack Johnson from travelling with the white woman, Lucille Cameron.

Whites tried to use Cameron to make a case against Johnson. She refused to help. Whites went to Belle Schreiber. She was a white woman Johnson knew before the Mann Act had passed (1909 and early 1910). In court, she said Johnson was with her. An all-white jury convicted Johnson of being with a white woman.

To escape jail, Johnson fled the country, for seven (7) years. When he came back, federal agents arrested him. Johnson was sent to the Federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas. He was behind bars from September 1920, until July 9, 1921.

Moynihan Report Released



Washington, D. C. - The Moynihan Report ('The Report') was released. It was written by Daniel Patrick Moynihan. He studied the plight of black Americans, in the United States.

Moynihan was Assistant Secretary of Labor for Policy, Planning and Research. He served from 1963 to 1965. This period covered the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson eras.

His work during this period, was used by President Johnson, in his War on Poverty. At the same time, it was used as a pretext to send black youth to the Vietnam War. At the time it was released, there was major unrest in the South, over black voting rights.

The Report stated the black family was at fault, for its poverty. It made family failure the cause of black dysfunction. It blamed single mothers and absent fathers as the root cause.

In 1971, 'Blame the Victim' was published. It showed the Moynihan Report to be self-serving and simple-minded. The Report ignored racism and bigotry as causes. It instead relied on the 'cultural deprivation' fallacy. 'Blame The Victim' also called this, Savage Discovery.

Source:

Moynihan Report

Kerner Report Published



Washington, D. C. - The President’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders wrote the Kerner Report.

On July 28, 1967, the Detroit uprising caused President Lyndon Baines Johnson to form the commission. It was led by Governor Otto Kerner, of Ohio. The report took his name.

The report gave a cause for the black uprisings in the country. There were more than 150 riots or major disorders between 1965 and 1968. 83 people killed and 1,800 injured, and most were black. $100 million in property was damaged or destroyed.

The 426-page report named “white racism” for the violence, not a conspiracy by black political groups.

Tuskegee Experiment Exposed



Washington, D. C. - A 40 year-long syphilis experiment on black men was exposed. The Washington Star reported the story. The United States government used black men as test subjects, without their consent.

600 black men were used. They were rural farmers. They were never told they had the disease. A cure was known, but the Federal government never treated the men.

The experiment ended only because it was exposed. No one was punished.

AIDS Disease Blamed on Black Women



Washington, D. C. - The Center for Disease Control (CDC) made its first attempt to blame AIDS on black women. After this report, race was counted as a factor in AIDS.

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) was the AIDS report from the CDC. It made a link betwen black and hispanic women and AIDS. Never again, was AIDS questioned as a disease. It made black women the face of it.

Source:

AIDS & Black women

AIDS Blamed on Black Americans

'The Vanishing Family: Crisis in Black America' First Aired on Television



New York, New York - CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) showed 'Crisis in Black America' on national television. Black people were shown as loose, broken, and hopeless. It showed black men as poor fathers.

The stories were from Newark, New Jersey. The problems of this city were used by CBS to present all black people in the same way. Bill Moyers, a white man, was the narrator.

The mothers and fathers were never shown talking to each together. Moyers only spoke to the women, or the men, but not at the same time. No black families were shown talking to one another. It implied black people were alienated from one another.

Moyers spoke to a black man, who said he gave no support to his six (6) children. This one statement sparked outrage among whites. Thus began the 'Deadbeat Dad' myth in the United States.

CBS aired this five (5) days after the first Martin Luther King Day in the United States.

Source:

The Vanishing Family: Crisis in Black America

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