Black History Month 2024

'founded' - 2 results

Howard University founded



Washington D. C. - A gathering of white church members met to create a school for missionaries in the South and Africa. It began as a Seminary.

Later, Major General Oliver Otis Howard was brought into the plan. Howard was known as a christian fundamentalist and was head of the Freedmen's Bureau.

On March 2, 1867, a Charter was approved by Congress. It was signed into law by President Andrew Johnson. This Act created Howard University.

On May 1, 1867, Howard University opened its doors to students. The first students were all white women. Two were daughters of the founders.

The initial reason for the school was to train Black American preachers. However, all were allowed to attend. Over 100,000 freed Black Americans were served by the school.

Howard University is still in operation, as of 2021.

Source:

Act to Establish The Howard University

Origin of The Howard University

Howard University history


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Tuskegee University founded



Tuskegee, Alabama - Tuskegee University began as the Tuskegee Normal School for Colored Teachers. It came from an agreement between a former Confederate Colonel, W.F. Foster, and a local Black American leader, Lewis Adams.

Foster sought to keep his office, in the 1880 election. He promised Adams a school for Black Americans, if he helped him get votes.

Adams delivered. Foster kept his promise. The State of Alabama passed a law for what would become Tuskegee University.

George W. Campbell, a former slave owner, recruited Booker T. Washington as principal. Washington held that position from July 4, 1881 until he died, in 1915.


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